All About Concrete Lifting

Topsoil vs. Rock Dust As Concrete is Being Lifted: As the name suggests, concrete lifting is used to raise sections of previously built and cured flatwork concrete that have settled below their original elevation. Concrete Hero-Concrete Lifting is one of the authority sites on this topic. For a residential home, the original concrete function could be a driveway, sidewalk, patio, stairs, and porch. Interior floors of a house or home are often laid out as a concrete slab on grade. In both instances, a sub base is prepared prior to installation with the aim of stabilising and supporting the flat concrete during its planned lifespan. This usefulness is expected to last for decades. To provide secure and smooth access to the land, the owner needs it to remain level, without degradation or spalling.

Due to years of traffic and natural exposure, several forms of soils in Utah determine how well any flat concrete can wear. Even the best-prepared subgrade can be harmed by seasonal freezing and thawing, excess moisture from irrigation systems, or rainfall. A soil type’s granular materials are usually adequate to provide long-term stability; however, some soils are expansive, meaning they expand and contract in response to moisture and freezing temperatures. Concrete on grade suffers as a result of this instability. Surfaces on expansive soils can react and shift in response to underlying grade changes. Furthermore, gutters and downspouts become unattached or clogged with leaves and other debris, allowing water to collect near the base and concrete slabs. This results in reversible drainage and settlement near certain concrete features, exacerbating any damage issues caused by excessive moisture.

Slab lifting is a great way to solve issues of ageing concrete surfaces. This technique has been used for at least 50 years. Originally, the word mud jacking referred to the use of topsoil as the primary filler. It offers a pressurised lifting mechanism that would carry a concrete slab back to its original elevation when mixed with a portion of Portland cement. While topsoil is inexpensive and readily available, it has a natural propensity to deteriorate because the average organic content of Utah topsoil is only 5%. In their natural state, these soils can decompose and provide nutrients to plants. Settlement can almost always occur as a result of the natural composting process. Recognizing the problem, many slab lifters have sought out more suitable filler materials.

In the concrete slab lifting process, Rock Dust, a substance made from ground limestone and used for safety purposes in the local coal mining industry, is an excellent substitute for topsoil. This material is combined with Portland cement and pumped under the concrete slab into 12 drilled holes. After all voids have been filled, the pressurised materials scattered in the slab exert upward pressure, and a regulated lift would return the slab to its original elevation.

Stable warranty problems are one of the inorganic material’s long-term advantages. There are few callbacks for slab lifting contractors that use Rock Dust. Due to their operation, there is no filler material breakdown and therefore no resulting settlement. Up to 20% of topsoil warranty callbacks are experienced by those in the industry.